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Personalized Plaques

  • The prompt for the vinyl cutting project.
  • Sketching our ideas out before we design on the computer.
  • Seeking feedback in our first round of sharing.
  • Seeking feedback in our first round of sharing.
  • First iteration on the computer.
  • First iteration on the computer.
  • First iteration on the computer.
  • First iteration on the computer.
  • First iteration on the computer.
  • First iteration on the computer.
  • First iteration on the computer.
  • First iteration on the computer.
  • First iteration on the computer.
  • Watching the vinyl cutter do its thing!
  • Watching the vinyl cutter do its thing!
  • Watching the vinyl cutter do its thing!
  • A fourth grader explains how the vinyl cutter works to some second graders.
  • "When can we use this Mr. Tiffin?"
  • The final design after multiple feedback rounds.
  • The final design after multiple feedback rounds.
  • The final design after multiple feedback rounds.
  • The final design after multiple feedback rounds.
  • Using the squeege to adhere the vinyl to the ceramic tile.
  • A finished plaque. Can you tell what this says about its creator?
  • 2016-02-05 12.52.25
  • A proud maker holds his finished plaque!
  • Proud makers with their plaques!
  • Another maker holds her plaque with pride!

Project Description

With the primary project prompt of “Create a plaque that tells people something about you”, students designed simple personalized plaques made of MDF, a ceramic tile and a custom-created vinyl sticker.

While simultaneously building skills with the vector graphic software Inkscape, understanding around file types, and their ability to design imagery for vinyl cutting, students were given a chance to innovate via an iterative work process and peer feedback. After sketching out initial plans for their plaques, students spent time looking at the work of others to offer suggestions, and to find possible ideas to incorporate into their own.

Additionally, a major learning experience was created around Creative Commons and work attribution. Students visited the site Freepik to find icons that could be imported via the .svg file format, but most of the files required attribution in some form. Students created a Google Doc that they could keep links to the icon source files on. This also allowed them to reference the exact images that they decided to use when it came time to physically give credit to the image creators on the plaque itself.

Project Details

Client

Fourth Grade

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